Royal Worcester Round Ash Tray tables

Royal Worcester price lists

Summary of information taken from Royal Worcester price lists and pattern books in the Museum of Royal Worcester archive. Some price lists are incomplete or missing and therefore this list is not comprehensive. It is intended to be used as a guide for dating and identification. PDF Down- load

 

Ring Ash Trays

The first record of the production of Ring Ash Trays is design number O279 dated July 1936. Four sizes of tray were made, in one design of a rose with a blue flower spray and three rings of silver around the edge. The two largest sizes, have remained in production for over 60 years. The name RA Tray (ring ash) is still used today by Royal Worcester employees.

Cigarette or cocktail sets?

From the late 1930’s Royal Worcester manufactured round trays in two sizes, which were intended for use as ash trays. These could be bought singly, in pairs or in a set with an oval cigarette holder. In the 1950’s American import tax laws were changed, levying duty on any
goods associated with tobacco. The description/name of the sets was therefore changed and they were referred to as cocktail sets or simply round trays to avoid the extra duty in America. A cylindrical/round cigarette box with a lid was first made in 1961 and a square cigarette box
with a cover was made from 1964. A circular cocktail stick holder with no lid was made for a few years from 1963.

From 1999 Royal Worcester began to market a collectors range of RA Trays – just to confuse everyone they are now calling the RA Trays – Coasters!

Coasters

Coasters were first produced at Grainger’s Worcester factory in the 1880’s. Coasters were flat bottomed tray, either round, square or oval in shape and had a ‘fluted’ rim. Grainger’s factory was bought by Royal Worcester in 1889. Royal Worcester manufactured coasters using Grainger’s moulds for many years.

These coasters were available in the same patterns as the RA Trays until the 1980’s.

Different shapes

Other items of complimentary giftware, in the same designs have been produced over the years by Royal Worcester. Powder boxes, Bon Bon dishes and covered boxes, bud vases, china bells, mugs, Irish coffee cups, cake plates and servers are a few of the items that have been made.

Bespoke and contract trays

In addition to the above listed patterns, Royal Worcester have manufactured many thousands of trays for special customers such as retail outlets, hotels, institutions, clubs and societies. These are made for the customer and are sold directly to them. They do not therefore appear in general factory price lists.

Archdale & Co
O444 1961
(two floral trays and holder)
Berrows Newspapers
O329
1955 (tray)
Browns Hotel
O392
1958 (11cm)
Chinese
O441
Christmas
O505
Christmas (Royal Worcester)
O331
1955 (tray)
Churchill
O479
Claridges
O447
Councillor Marshall, Mayor of Worcester
O377
1962-63
Commemorative Collectors Society
O531
Commonwealth Parliamentary Association
O511. O521
County Cricket
O480
Dorchester Hotel
O532 (two sizes from 1958)
O450 (cocktail set)
English Monarchy 1,000 years
O535
Evesham Borough civic crest
O467
1964
Giffard Hotel
O516
House of Commons
O459, O483
1963 (tray and holder)
Iolan the figure
O408
1959 (Savoy hotel)
Kay & Co Ltd
O482 and O484
1963 (Edgar Tower and Worcester Cathedral)
Lloyds of London
Mayflower
O514
Marshall, Mayor of Worcester
O377
1962
Meco golden Jubilee
O403
1909 – 1959
Pershore Millennium
O524
Pope John Pauls visit to England
1983
RNLI (The Schooner John Slater)
O603
1974 (150th Anniversary)
Three Choirs Festival
O464
1963 (tray)
Tomkinsons Kidderminster
O455
1962
Worcester Amateur Boxing Club
O432
1961 (view of cathedral)
Worcester Regiment
O499
Worcester Charter Festival
O518

 

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